Rain Water Collection Systems

1
Catchment surface – The RWCS usually starts with a roof.
2
The Conveyance sub-system consists of several details including gutters, covers, pre-filtration & trunkline.
3
The Storage tank can be the most visible and is the most expensive component in a RWCS.
4
Distribution system -This sub-system can be as simple as a gravity fed hose or as sophisticated as a pressurized pump

A Rain Water Collection System, or “RWCS” for short, is a system set in place to harness and maintain precipitation from a local environment. This can be for a variety of reasons, but ultimately the goal is to have usable water at the ready.

1. Catchment surface (roof)

Catchment surface – The RWCS usually starts with a roof.

Catchment surface – The RWCS usually starts with a roof.  The roof is one of the main components in calculating the amount of rainwater that can be collected and is a key component of system size.  The following formula can be used when calculating the approximate potential of collected rainwater.

Potential Rainwater collection (gal) = Catchment area (ft²) X Rainfall depth (in.) X 0.623
OR
A 1,000 sq. ft. roof in a 1″ rain event has the potential to collect 623 gallons of rainwater 

To calculate the annual potential of your RWCS you’ll need to know the annual average precipitation for your area and insert this number in rainfall depth.  In the central Texas region, you can use 34″.  This number is an average over the last 30 years.  The above 1,000 sq. ft. the roof could potentially collect 21,182 gallons of FREE Rainwater annually!  If you are not in this area use the precipitation map below.

TX Rainfall MapUS Rainfall Map

2.The Conveyance

The Conveyance sub-system consists of several details including gutters, covers, pre-filtration & trunkline.

The Conveyance sub-system consists of several details including gutters, covers, pre-filtration & trunkline.  The trunkline can be dry or wet depending on a few factors such as size & complexityproperty topography, economics & customer desire & esthetics.  The above model depicts a wet trunk-line.  Most high capacity systems (10K & higher) deploy a wet trunkline.

3.The Storage tank 

The Storage tank can be the most visible and is the most expensive component in an RWCS.

The Storage tank can be the most visible and is the most expensive component in an RWCS.   Tanks and cisterns can be made of many materials, sizes & shapes.  The most common & economical tanks are Polyethylene or other plastic materials.  Small (2,500 -5,000 gallons) poly tanks are very popular due their cost & ease of installation.   Systems above 5,000 gallons are usually made from metal, fiberglass, concrete & steel and sometimes a combination of these materials.

4.Distribution System

 This sub-system can be as simple as a gravity fed hose or as sophisticated as a pressurized pump servicing multiple points of use.

Distribution system – This sub-system can be as simple as a gravity fed hose or as sophisticated as a pressurized pump servicing multiple points of use.   In potable systems, post filtration & UV lighting are configured to meet NSF-61 drinking water specifications.